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Cycling

Llŷn Cycle Routes

Llŷn and Eifionydd, is a gentle rural landscape of vales and hills, with rocky coves and sandy beaches. It is a land steeped in history with a living and thriving community. The routes described here follow narrow lanes winding between banks and hedgerows studded with wild flowers that include primroses, foxgloves, red campions, bluebells, honeysuckles and meadowsweet. Hawthorne, blackthorn, gorse and broom provide shelter. Oak, elm and sycamore are the larger trees whilst in Eifionydd rowan is common. What better way to take in the scenery and to explore this fascinating area than by bicycle?

 

Mynydd yr Ystum

Start & Finish: Aberdaron
Parking: Centre of Aberdaron
Approximate distance: 19 miles
Time allowance: 2-3 hours
Nearest public transport: Railway: Pwllheli
Nearest services for Cyclists:
Edge of Wales, Aberdaron, 01758 760652
Cycle Parts & repairing – Llŷn Cycle Centre, Yr Ala, Pwllheli, 01758 612414

590 500 Mynydd Yr Ystum MapA

This journey begins along a section of the Pilgrims’ Way to Bardsey Island in the picturesque village of Aberdaron. Here, in the church of St. Hywyn can be found two 6th Century headstones. Y Gegin Fawr, now a popular cafe, was once a stopping off point for pilgrims before the perilous crossing of Bardsey Sound. History abounds here and our trail passes an ancient burial chamber, a standing stone and a Stone Age weapons factory. The tranquil church in Llangwnnadl, another saintly destination, is also worth visiting.

For a map and journey details download: Taith Mynydd Yr Ystum Route

 

Garn Fadryn

Start & Finish: Abersoch TIC
Parking: next to Abersoch Village Hall
Approximate distance: 27 miles
Time allowance: 3 – 4 hours
Nearest public transport: Railway: Pwllheli
Nearest Services for Cyclists:
Edge of Wales, Aberdaron, 01758 760652
Cycle Parts & repairing – Llŷn Cycle Centre, Yr Ala, Pwllheli, 01758 612414

590 500 Garn Fadryn MapB

Ascending towards Mynytho, the view ahead is dominated by rocky Garn Fadryn. To the left is Porth Neigwl (Hell’s Mouth) with Ynys Enlli (Bardsey Island) beyond. From the picnic site under Foel Gron, Mynytho, there is a magnificent  view across Bae Ceredigion (Cardigan Bay) to the mountains of Meirionnydd. St Tudwall’s islands lie beyond the bustle of Abersoch’s bay.

For a map and journey details download: Taith Garn Fadryn Route

 

Garn Boduan

Start & Finish: Y Groes Nefyn
Parking: Stryd y Plas, Nefyn
Approximate distance: 17 miles
Time allowance: 2 – 3 hours
Nearest public transport: Pwllhelil Station
Nearest Services for Cyclists:
Edge of Wales, Aberdaron, 01758 760652
Cycle Parts & repairing – Llŷn Cycle Centre, Yr Ala, Pwllheli, 01758 612414

590 500 Garn Boduan MapC

The little town of Nefyn received its charter from the Black Prince in 1355, and has a long history of seafaring. Nefyn was once famous for its herring fishing industry. The town’s coat of arms depicts three of these fish. A maritime museum is housed in the old Church. While ascending the hill to Mynydd Nefyn a splendid retrospective view of Nefyn and Porthdinllaen unfolds. These two bays were once busy ports and echoed to the sounds of ship-building. The three peaks seen to the left are known as Yr Eifl (in English the Rivals).

For a map and journey details download: Taith Garn Boduan Route

 

Garn Bentyrch

Start & Finish: Carpark opposite madryn Arms, Chwilog
Parking: opposite Madryn Arms, Chwilog
Approximate distance: 14 miles
Time allowance: 2 – 2½ hours
Nearest Public Transport: Railway Pwllheli Station
Nearest Services for Cyclists: Edge of Wales, Aberdaron, 01758 760652
Cycle Parts & repairing – Llŷn Cycle Centre, Yr Ala, Pwllheli, 01758 612414

590 500 Garn Bentyrch MapD

A remarkable feature of this region, known as Eifionydd, is Y Lôn Goed (lôn = lane, coed = trees). This stretches north from Afonwen near Chwilog to Brynengan on the slopes of Mynydd Cennin. Planted in the early 19th Century to serve the Talhenbont Estate, this avenue of beech and oak provides a fascinating seven mile walk. Your route crosses Y Lôn Goed near the farm of Betws Fawr and joins Lôn Las Cymru (National Cycle Nerwork Route 8) for a short section until this divides and eventually joins Lôn Eifion, part of Gwynedd Council’s countryside access network known as Lonydd Glas.

For a map and journey details download: Taith Garn Bentyrch Route

Health Benefits

Regular and moderate cycling or walking can:

  • Lower blood pressure.
  • Lower cholesterol levels.
  • Strengthen bones and muscles.
  • Help to control your weight.

All the above contribute to a wide range of health problems, including coronary heart disease. Walking and cycling can reduce the risk of a stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis and obesity. If you’re out of practice for walking or cycling, the mainly flat and traffic free Lonydd Glas routes can offer you an excellent place to get back into the habit.

 

You can obtain further information and advice on walking and cycling as a way of improving your health from your family doctor or Health Awareness Service.

Good Cycling Code

Read the Highway Code; always follow it.

Act considerately; particularly on shared use paths.

Beware of pedestrians; ring your bell or politely call out to them.

Make sure your bicycle is roadworthy.

Take extra care at road junctions, on steep hills and in damp conditions.

Wear a cycle helmet and bright reflective clothing.